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Prevention. When it comes to cancer, there are a lot of things we can’t control. Shouldn’t we be doing everything we can to stack the cards in our favour? 1 in 3 cancer cases are preventable. Check out the tabs below to learn about cancer prevention.
  • body
  • food

Cardiovascular exercise is when we exert our muscles to get our heart pumping more than usual. Our body operates like a machine. Blood carries the fuel, oxygen & nutrients, to the engine our heart. This type of activity demands more power from our heart & lungs. In the wordsof kanye: Making them harder better faster stronger, which improves our stress tolerance, stamina, injury and disease resistance. So whether you’re lying on a couch or running a marathon an athletic heart more efficiently pumps blood and delivers fuel to your cells. CARDIO DOS: Warm up and cool down. Drink lots of water, it’s free Easy does it. Gradually increase the intensity of your workout. Pencil your workouts in, in pen. CARDIO DON’TS: DON’T binge. 5 workouts on Saturday doesn’t make up for a week of excuses. DON’T WORK THROUGH THE PAIN. If it hurts, stop. DON’T go too hard too fast. It’s better if you last. DON’T forget to take a day of rest. Your muscles need time to repair and rebuild.

Types of Cardio Training

RUNNING: From jogging to sprinting, running is not only a great way to get around, but a fantastic way to ditch your stress and excess pounds. Perks: Builds bone density and protects against osteoporosis. Known side effects include sexy calves and happy hamstrings. Budget: Can be done anywhere, anytime. All you need is a good pair of running shoes to keep your muscles safe. Caution: From cars to curbs, this high-impact sport can be a precarious pastime.The impact from running can be tough on your joints.
BIKING: This low impact exercise moonlights as a mode of transportation and leads to a sexy body. Toning and firming of the thighs, quads, the calf muscles and the pelvis region. Perks: Builds strength and muscle tone, increases stamina, reduces stress. Budget: Biking without a bike is hard, so it’s kind of expensive. Good news! Every gym has one. A gym without a stationary bike is like a sandwich without bread, it’s just not right. Caution: Crashes, strains, and sprains are always a risk. Be prepared to get intimate with a car. Use your head. Wear a helmet!
SWIMMING: Swimming is the pavement and pedal-free method for developing Phelps-like muscles all over. Perks: Low impact Can be done at any age. Builds muscle. Budget: Swimming is cheap, the only thing you need is a swimsuit and water, speedos welcome. Caution: Earaches, tendonitis, swimmers shoulder, chlorine exposure can occur. Oh, and then there’s the drowning.
WALKING: Skipping’s lazy sister: she’s low impact and gets around, but not to be underestimated – this casual cardio builds bone density and improves circulation. Perks: Can be done anywhere. Great way to start getting active or stay active at any age. Budget: Free! But good shoes are advised. Joints can be costly. Caution: Unless you’re drunk you should be good to go. A good hat, map, and water bottle can help.

Strength training makes our muscles stronger muscles relax & contract to move our body. Muscle contractions are powerful. Some give you orgasms some give you babies. They burn energy demanding blood & oxygen to be circulated throughout the body which strengthens our heart. The bigger & stronger our muscles are, the more energy & nutrients our body is consuming. So rock out popeye style. Strength dos: Use proper form. Keep your core muscles tight to protect lower back and improve balance. Breathe out, breathe in. Breathe out as you lift weight, breathe in as you lower weight. Balance opposing muscle groups. Like ryan gosling does sooo well. Change up muscle groups daily. You wouldn’t wear the same underwear twice. Like goldilocks, make sure you find a weight that is just right. Strength don’ts: Don’t skip warm-up. Think of it as foreplay. Don’t rush, slow controlled movements are best. Don’t work through the pain. If it hurts, stop.

Types of Strength Training

Weightlifting: Weightlifting involves lifting various dumbbells and barbells (or your neighbors fat cat) in a controlled manner to build muscle and shed fat. Perks: Increases muscle strength. Boosts metabolism and promotes fat loss. Plus it legit lets you hang out at muscle beach. Budget: Could be really cheap if you lift things around the house or lift other people’s kids at the store (don’t do this, just join a gym). Caution: Muscle tears, strained sphincters and tendonitis are common.it’s not about the size, it’s about how you use it, so shed the ego.
PLYOMETRICS: This form of power training includes explosive movements that challenge muscles to reach maximum force in the shortest possible time. Think bunny hops and tuck jumps. Perks: You’ll jump like a masaai, kick like a ninja, punch like Ali, and run like Forest did. Increases muscle strength. Budget: Price varies greatly: you can plyo solo, using mobile apps and with a trainer. Caution: Many think jumping is only for joy, but it requires coordination-be careful. Warm up first to prep your muscles.
Pilates: Pilates balances the body through core strength, flexibility and awareness. If routinely practiced the body will learn how to move efficiently and gracefully. Perks: Improves posture, muscle strength, flexibility and endurance. Rumor has it, it makes you taller too. Budget: Depending on if you do a private or shared class. Luckily, classes can be supplemented in home with DVDs and books. Caution: Muscle tears and pulls.People trying to do laundry on your washboard abs.

Flexibilityis the range of movements in our joints & muscles our muslces are like rubber bands. They expand & contract as the body moves. Activites that lengthen our muslces like yoga & stretching help to increase our overall flexibility. Body bendiness has many benefits makes us nimble, resistant to injury, creates elasticity in our arteries, brings fresh blood to muscles helping us to feel brighter, sleep deeper. Important: If we don’t stretch our muscles become brittle & tight. Stretching is like shutting down your computer at the end of the day you know you should but it’s easy to blow off (don’t)! Flexibility do’s: Inhale & slowly exhale as you stretch to the point of tension. Hold each stretch for 20-30 seconds or longer. Relax. Flexibility don’ts: Don’t bounce. Don’t stretch a muscle that isn’t warmed up. An easy 5-10 minute warm-up will do the trick. Don’t be a masochist, stretch until you feel tension not pain.

Types of flexibility Training

STRETCHING: The act of of slow and controlled stretch-hold muscle exercises to increase flexibility, prep your muscles for more vigorous exercise, or just relax. Perks: Makes you stretchy. Increases range of motion in your joints. Boosts circulation. Reduces muscle tension. Budget: Free as a bird. You can buy resistance bands for an assisted stretch for $5-50. Caution: Muscle strain and tearing can occur if you do too much too soon or push yourself too far.
YOGA: An ancient Eastern spiritual and physical discipline, which is a combination of breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures. Perks: Yoga is your bowflex, your chill pill and your thai masseuse all in one. Budget: There are many types of yoga, ranging from $10-20 per class. You can also do it at home with DVDs, podcasts or by streaming classes online. That way you can fart in the comfort of your own home. Caution: Look out for pulled and torn muscles, carpal tunnel and rotator cuff injuries. You may bruise your throat from om-ing too much.

Alkaline: Just like the earth’s climate must stay in a tight temperature range for humans to survive, our bodies must maintain aciditylevels very carefully to keep us safe. By eating foods that tend to be acidic, processed, animal protein, sugary, you add extra stress on your body’s ability to maintain this balance. As your body tries to restore the ph levels, this puts stress on the organs and can lead to aging & disease. So we must put more alkaline forming foods into the body. Don’t be fooled – a lemon is actually alkaline! By eating alkaline foods your body is infused with cancer fighting nurtrients. How it relates to cancer: An acidic environment is the place to be if you’re a cancer cell that wants to grow big, strong and fast. By keeping your diet on the alkaline side your body becomes an anti-cancer habitat. Your body eliminates toxins better and your body tissues are able to store more oxygen in them (did we mention cancer cells aren’t big fans of oxygen?). What you can do about it: Eat plant-based whole foods and infuse your body with alkaline nutrients which will help your body maintain health. Include a variety of fruits and vegetables that are raw or lightly cooked. Green vegetables are especially alkaline!
Antioxidants: Like your checkbook & your diet, the cells in your body need balance. Everything from daily processes like eating, breathing, environmental toxins, radiation can cause cells to become imbalanced. In geek speak, molecules are stripped of an electron. This creates a chain reaction a molecule loses an electron, and becomes a “free radical”. The free radical thensteals an electron from a healthy molecule. Antioxidants stop the vicious electron stealing cycle. Antioxidants seek out imbalanced cells to replace theirstolen electron. How it relates to cancer: Over time, the damage to our dna and other molecules caused by free radicals can become permanent and lead to disease, such as cancer. Dna damage of blood cells was shown in a study to be a predictor of whole body cancer risk and antioxidant consumption greatly reduced the risk in various parts of the body. What you can do about it: Eating foods high in antioxidants have been shown to rapidly reduce the effects of free radicals in the body, meaning less damage and death of your cells. Adding antioxidants to your diet couldn’t be easier. Everything from carrots to kale has ‘em so read up to get down with antioxidants. Just think, the next time you are a delicious strawberry smoothie, knowing that it is chock-full of antioxidants may help you enjoy it even more.
Alcohol: How does this delicious drink affect the body? Alcohol affects the brain & the liver. The liver keeps us alive. It is responsible for filtering toxins from the body. It is the protector. When we stress the liver the body cannot function optimally. Excessive alcohol consumption leads to oxidative stress. This is an imbalance that reduces your cells’ ability to repair. The solution here is balance. Choose wisely and take care of your liver. How it relates to cancer: There are some cases in which alcohol should clearly be avoided during cancer treatment. For example, alcohol – even in very small amounts – can irritate mouth sores caused by some cancer treatments, and can make them worse. Alcohol can also interact with some drugs used during cancer treatment, increasing the risk of harmful side effects. Acidity. Alcohol creates an acidic environment in your body, which cancer thrives in. Alcohol increases your risk of breast, colorectal, esophageal, larynx, pharynx, stomach, liver cancer. What you can do about it: Be realistic. Don’t avoid alcohol, moderate it. Alternate, hydrate. Alternate alcoholic beverages with water to reduce stress on your body.
Organic: Organic food is pesticde & herbicide free food. It is not processed using industrial solvents or chemical additives and it does not contain gmos (genetically modified organisms). Organic growers have to ensure that they take every precaution to avoid gmo contaminated crops. We don’t know how harmful gmo foods can be on our bodies. Although there have been links between gmo foods and cancer. So to be on the safe side, stick to an organic food diet as it poses no risk to your health & well-being. How it relates to cancer: Chemicals found in pesticides and herbicides have been proven to cause cancer. What you can do about it: Choose organic when you can. Check out this list to find out when you should splurge on organic and when to save. Just because it says organic on the package doesn’t mean that it’s good for you. Deally avoid the package and grab the whole food.
Dairy: Dairy is a type of food that is made from the milk of mammals. We all digest dairy differently. Ethnicity & genes have a lot to do with our ability to digest the sugar in milk called lactose. When someone can’tdigest lactose they are lactose intolerant. Being intolerant to dairy can cause an inflammatory response in the body. Continual inflammation stresses our organs out, irritates their tissue, promotes abnormal cell growth, and it is greatly linked to cancer. Most people do better consuming small amounts of dairy or a dairy free diet obtain calcium through other sources like leafy greens seasame seeds & legumes. How it relates to cancer: Continual inflammation promotes abnormal cell growth which can lead to the development of cancerous cells. Guys who drink more than two servings of dairy a day increase their risk of prostate cancer by 34% compared to those who drink none. Ladies: For every 10 grams of lactose (which you can find in one glass of milk) you increase your risk of ovarian cancer by 13%. What you can do about it: Cut dairy out of your life for two weeks and then slowly bring it back in. Once re-introduced, monitor how you feel. If it makes you bloated, gassy, crampy (among other symptoms), learn how to eat using alternatives.
Sugar: Sugar is a simple carbohydrate. It comes in many different forms such as sucrose, lactose, fructose. We’re not talking about natural fruit & vegetable sugar. We’re talking about processed sugar that sneaks its way into our diet. You can find this sugar in all of it’s forms added to most packaged foods. Sugar is like a snake that finds its way into anything it can so keep an eye out for it! Sugar affects the balance of our blood sugar and can lead to storage of fats & weight gain. How it relates to cancer: A diet high in sugar and it’s scary chemical alternatives puts added stress on the body and leads to imbalances in blood sugar levels and stored fat. Anytime there is a state of imbalance, your body’s energy is directed to correcting the imbalance instead of healing and destroying cancer cells. What you can do about it: Read labels – be aware of the different forms that sugar takes. Avoid buying processed food as almost all of it has added sugar. Choose whole food sweeteners. For example, if you make banana bread soak some dates and mash them up instead of sugar. As you start to use whole food to sweeten you’ll notice your craving for sugar reduces and your palate begins to change.

Early detection. Early detection is about self-awareness. It’s about knowing your risk level. It’s about recognizing the early warning signs. It’s about tuning in to  what your body is telling you and reacting accordingly. 90% of cancers are curable in stage 1. Click the tabs below to start looking for cancer instead of just finding it.
  • warning signs
  • risk factors
  • annual diagnostics
  • self exams
  • cheat sheets

Warning Signs

  • Female
  • male

Add All That Apply:
  • Pain in your lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • A change in eye movement and or displacement of your eyeball
  • A change in how your dentures fit
  • Anemia
  • Bad-smelling breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Bulging of one eye
  • Change in ability to concentrate
  • Change in vision
  • Changes in hearing
  • Changes in mood/personality
  • Changes in speech
  • Changes in vision
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Contracting a dark spot on your iris, which continually gets larger
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Dizziness or problems balancing or walking
  • Ear ache
  • Enlarged glands in your neck
  • Enlarged tonsils
  • Facial flushing
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Hoarseness
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Lump in your neck
  • Lump on the back of your tongue
  • Memory problems
  • Painless swelling in neck lymph nodes
  • Seeing floaters or flashes of light
  • Sensation of something “stuck” in your throat
  • Sleeping for longer periods at night and napping frequently
  • Sore throat
  • Sores in the eyes
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Throat pain
  • Yellowing of your skin and eyes
  • Excessive hair growth
  • A lump in, or thickening of the cheek
  • Constant bad breath
  • Persistant pain in the mouth
  • Sore in the mouth that does not heal
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • White spot on the gums
  • Bleeding from the front of the eye
  • Pain in eye
  • Pupil does not get smaller when exposed to bright light
  • Reddening in the white part of the eye
  • Vision problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Chronic coughing or wheezing
  • Coughing blood
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Sensation of having a ‘lump in the throat’
  • Sore in the throat that does not heal
  • Swelling or pain in the neck

  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your arm
  • Painless swelling in under arm lymph nodes
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Blocked airway
  • Changes to skin surface of your breast
  • Chest pain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dimpling, thickening or flaking of your nipple
  • Heart disease
  • Heartburn
  • Indigestion
  • Inversion or shape change of nipple
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Lump under your arm, above your collarbone, or in your breast that remains for more than a week
  • Nipple discharge
  • Pain behind the breastbone
  • Pain or tenderness in nipple that does not go away
  • Painless swelling in chest lymph nodes
  • Persistent cough
  • Pneumonia
  • Post-obstructive pneumonia
  • Recurrent bronchitis
  • Wheezing or asthma-like symptoms
  • Weight gain
  • Lump or mass on your side
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Abdominal pain
  • Ascites (buildup of fluid)
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Discomfort or falsely feeling the need for a bowel movement
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Gas
  • Intestinal bleeding
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lump on your right side, just below the ribcage
  • Melena (dark stools containing blood)
  • Nausea
  • Pain in your side
  • Pain on your upper left side of your abdomen
  • Swelling near your intestines
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Weight gain
  • Purple stretch marks on the abdomen
  • Ascites (fluid in the abdomen)
  • Bloating
  • Changes in bowel function
  • Pain in abdomen
  • Abdominal pain in the upper right part of the belly
  • Enlarged Gallbladder
  • Weight loss
  • Black, tar like stool
  • Indigestion
  • Aching & cramping
  • Swelling of the belly
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Bladder spasms
  • Bleeding after intercourse
  • Bleeding after menopause
  • Bleeding between periods in premenopausal women
  • Bleeding or spotting between regular menstrual periods
  • Blood in urine
  • Chronic bladder irritation
  • Dark urine
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Enlarged glands in your groin area
  • Frequent heavy bleeding before or after menopause
  • Frequent urination
  • Growth on your hip
  • Intense urgency to urinate
  • Irregular periods
  • Menstrual periods last longer and heavier than usual
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Pain during urination
  • Pelvic pain
  • Prolonged periods
  • Reduced bladder capacity
  • Swelling of your testicles
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your groin area
  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Infertility
  • Pain in pelvic area
  • Appendicitis
  • Bleeding when not menstruating
  • Lump on the vulva
  • Tenderness of the Vulvar
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your leg
  • Growth on your lower leg
  • Leg pain
  • Swelling in your leg
  • Swelling of your ankles and legs
  • Weakness in the legs

  • Pain in your lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • A change in eye movement and or displacement of your eyeball
  • A change in how your dentures fit
  • Anemia
  • Bad-smelling breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Bulging of one eye
  • Change in ability to concentrate
  • Change in vision
  • Changes in hearing
  • Changes in mood/personality
  • Changes in speech
  • Changes in vision
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Contracting a dark spot on your iris, which continually gets larger
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Dizziness or problems balancing or walking
  • Ear ache
  • Enlarged glands in your neck
  • Enlarged tonsils
  • Facial flushing
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Hoarseness
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Lump in your neck
  • Lump on the back of your tongue
  • Memory problems
  • Painless swelling in neck lymph nodes
  • Seeing floaters or flashes of light
  • Sensation of something “stuck” in your throat
  • Sleeping for longer periods at night and napping frequently
  • Sore throat
  • Sores in the eyes
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Throat pain
  • Yellowing of your skin and eyes
  • Excessive hair growth
  • A lump in, or thickening of the cheek
  • Constant bad breath
  • Persistant pain in the mouth
  • Sore in the mouth that does not heal
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • White spot on the gums
  • Bleeding from the front of the eye
  • Pain in eye
  • Pupil does not get smaller when exposed to bright light
  • Reddening in the white part of the eye
  • Vision problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Chronic coughing or wheezing
  • Coughing blood
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Sensation of having a ‘lump in the throat’
  • Sore in the throat that does not heal
  • Swelling or pain in the neck
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your arm
  • Painless swelling in under arm lymph nodes
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Growth on your back
  • Lower back pain
  • Lump on your back
  • Pain under your right shoulder blade
  • Fat deposits behind the neck and shoulders
  • Bleeding from rectum
  • Bleeding from the anus
  • Discharge of mucus from the anus
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your anal area
  • Persistent anal itching
  • Sore on or near the anus
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your leg
  • Growth on your lower leg
  • Leg pain
  • Swelling in your leg
  • Swelling of your ankles and legs
  • Weakness in the legs

  • An open sore that lasts for more than 4 weeks
  • Growth that increases in size and looks pearly, translucent, tan, brown, black, red, pink or multi-colored
  • Mole that changes color and texture, takes on an uneven shape, gets larger, or is bigger than a pencil eraser
  • Pellagra
  • Scaly or crusty bump that is dry, rough, and sticks out like a horn. It may sometimes cause a pricking or tender feeling in your skin
  • Skin lesions
  • Spot or growth that continues to itch, hurt, crust, scab, fade or bleed
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes
  • Severe Itching
  • Persistant Itching
  • Open Sore
  • Thickening and noticeable change in skin colour
  • Wart like bumps
  • Skin lesions
  • Fatigue
  • A change in your stool shape
  • Anemia
  • Blood in stool
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Frequent infections
  • High blood pressure
  • Lymph nodes are enlarged
  • Muscle jerking or twitching
  • Night sweats
  • Numbing sensation
  • Paralysis on one side of body
  • Persistent itchiness of skin
  • Recurrent fever (not from cold, flu or other infection)
  • Secondary diabetes
  • Swollen lymph-nodes
  • Tingling sensation
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Weakness
  • Pain or tenderness in a specific bone
  • Persistent aching that worsens at night
  • Difficulty moving the affected joint
  • Lump or swelling

  • Pain in your lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • A change in eye movement and or displacement of your eyeball
  • A change in how your dentures fit
  • Anemia
  • Bad-smelling breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Bulging of one eye
  • Change in ability to concentrate
  • Change in vision
  • Changes in hearing
  • Changes in mood/personality
  • Changes in speech
  • Changes in vision
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Contracting a dark spot on your iris, which continually gets larger
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Dizziness or problems balancing or walking
  • Ear ache
  • Enlarged glands in your neck
  • Enlarged tonsils
  • Facial flushing
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Hoarseness
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Lump in your neck
  • Lump on the back of your tongue
  • Memory problems
  • Painless swelling in neck lymph nodes
  • Seeing floaters or flashes of light
  • Sensation of something “stuck” in your throat
  • Sleeping for longer periods at night and napping frequently
  • Sore throat
  • Sores in the eyes
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Throat pain
  • Yellowing of your skin and eyes
  • A lump in, or thickening of the cheek
  • Constant bad breath
  • Persistant pain in the mouth
  • Sore in the mouth that does not heal
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • White spot on the gums
  • Bleeding from the front of the eye
  • Pain in eye
  • Pupil does not get smaller when exposed to bright light
  • Reddening in the white part of the eye
  • Vision problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Chronic coughing or wheezing
  • Coughing blood
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Sensation of having a ‘lump in the throat’
  • Sore in the throat that does not heal
  • Swelling or pain in the neck
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your arm
  • Painless swelling in under arm lymph nodes
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Blocked airway
  • Chest pain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Heart disease
  • Heartburn
  • Indigestion
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Pain behind the breastbone
  • Painless swelling in chest lymph nodes
  • Persistent cough
  • Pneumonia
  • Post-obstructive pneumonia
  • Recurrent bronchitis
  • Wheezing or asthma-like symptoms
  • Weight gain
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Discomfort or falsely feeling the need for a bowel movement
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Intestinal bleeding
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lump on your right side, just below the ribcage
  • Melena (dark stools containing blood)
  • Nausea
  • Pain in your side
  • Pain on your upper left side of your abdomen
  • Swelling near your intestines
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Vomiting
  • Weight gain
  • Purple stretch marks on the abdomen
  • Ascites (fluid in the abdomen)
  • Bloating
  • Changes in bowel function
  • Pain in abdomen
  • Abdominal pain in the upper right part of the belly
  • Enlarged Gallbladder
  • Nausea
  • Weight loss
  • Black, tar like stool
  • Weight loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Indigestion
  • Aching & cramping
  • Swelling of the belly
  • An intense urgency to urinate
  • Bladder spasms
  • Blood in semen
  • Blood in urine
  • Change in feeling of testicles
  • Chronic bladder irritation
  • Dark urine
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Enlarged glands in your groin area
  • Frequent bone pain in your hips or upper thigh
  • Frequent urination
  • Groin pain
  • Growth on your hip
  • Intense urgency to urinate
  • Lump on your testicle
  • Pain during urination
  • Pain or burning during urination
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or scrotum
  • Painful ejaculation
  • Pelvic pain
  • Reduced bladder capacity
  • Sense of incompletely emptying your bladder
  • Swelling of your testicles
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your groin area
  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Infertility
  • Pain in pelvic area
  • Appendicitis
  • Bleeding from the tip of the penis
  • Persistant Itching
  • Lump on the head of the penis
  • Redness, irritation or sore on the penis
  • Persistant-Itching-Bleeding-when-not-menstruating”>Bleeding when not menstruating

    Persistant-Itching-Lump-on-the-vulva”>Lump on the vulva

    Persistant-Itching-Tenderness-of-the-Vulvar”>Tenderness of the Vulvar

  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your leg
  • Growth on your lower leg
  • Swelling in your leg
  • Swelling of your ankles and legs
  • Weakness in the legs

  • Pain in your lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • A change in eye movement and or displacement of your eyeball
  • A change in how your dentures fit
  • Anemia
  • Bad-smelling breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Bulging of one eye
  • Change in ability to concentrate
  • Change in vision
  • Changes in hearing
  • Changes in mood/personality
  • Changes in speech
  • Changes in vision
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Contracting a dark spot on your iris, which continually gets larger
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Dizziness or problems balancing or walking
  • Ear ache
  • Enlarged glands in your neck
  • Enlarged tonsils
  • Facial flushing
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Hoarseness
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Lump in your neck
  • Lump on the back of your tongue
  • Memory problems
  • Painless swelling in neck lymph nodes
  • Seeing floaters or flashes of light
  • Sensation of something “stuck” in your throat
  • Sleeping for longer periods at night and napping frequently
  • Sore throat
  • Sores in the eyes
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Throat pain
  • Yellowing of your skin and eyes
  • A lump in, or thickening of the cheek
  • Constant bad breath
  • Persistant pain in the mouth
  • Sore in the mouth that does not heal
  • Difficulty or painful swallowing
  • White spot on the gums
  • Bleeding from the front of the eye
  • Pain in eye
  • Pupil does not get smaller when exposed to bright light
  • Reddening in the white part of the eye
  • Vision problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Chronic coughing or wheezing
  • Coughing blood
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Sensation of having a ‘lump in the throat’
  • Sore in the throat that does not heal
  • Swelling or pain in the neck
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your arm
  • Painless swelling in under arm lymph nodes
  • Swelling in your arm
  • Frequent lower back pain
  • Growth on your back
  • Lower back pain
  • Lump on your back
  • Pain under your right shoulder blade
  • Fat deposits behind the neck and shoulders
  • Bleeding from rectum
  • Bleeding from the anus
  • Discharge of mucus from the anus
  • Persistent anal itching
  • Sore on or near the anus
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your anal area
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your leg
  • Growth on your lower leg
  • Swelling in your leg
  • Swelling of your ankles and legs
  • Weakness in the legs

  • An open sore that lasts for more than 4 weeks
  • Growth that increases in size and looks pearly, translucent, tan, brown, black, red, pink or multi-colored
  • Mole that changes color and texture, takes on an uneven shape, gets larger, or is bigger than a pencil eraser
  • Pellagra
  • Scaly or crusty bump that is dry, rough, and sticks out like a horn. It may sometimes cause a pricking or tender feeling in your skin
  • Skin lesions
  • Spot or growth that continues to itch, hurt, crust, scab, fade or bleed
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes
  • Severe Itching
  • Persistant Itching
  • Open Sore
  • Thickening and noticeable change in skin colour
  • Wart like bumps
  • Fatigue
  • A change in your stool shape
  • Anemia
  • Blood in stool
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Frequent infections
  • High blood pressure
  • Lymph nodes are enlarged
  • Muscle jerking or twitching
  • Night sweats
  • Numbing sensation
  • Paralysis on one side of body
  • Persistent itchiness of skin
  • Recurrent fever (not from cold, flu or other infection)
  • Secondary diabetes
  • Swollen lymph-nodes
  • Tingling sensation
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Weakness
  • Pain or tenderness in a specific bone
  • Persistent aching that worsens at night
  • Difficulty moving the affected joint
  • Lump or swelling

Symptoms:
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Risk Factors

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Background
  • Lifestyle
  • family history
  • medical history
  • personal history
  • other

Add All That Apply:
  • 5 years or younger
  • 5 or older
  • 15 or older
  • 30 or older
  • 40 or older
  • 45 or older
  • 50 or older
  • 55 or older
  • 60 or older
  • 65 or older

  • Male
  • Female

  • I am African American
  • I am Caucasian
  • I am of Asian descent
  • I am of Central American descent
  • I am of Chinese descent
  • I am of Eastern European descent
  • I am of Japanese descent
  • I am of South American descent
  • I am of Southern/Eastern European descent

  • I am a heavy drinker
  • I am a Smoker
  • I am in the sun a lot
  • I am often outside without sunscreen
  • I am overweight
  • I became sexually active at a young age
  • I chew tobacco or betel quid
  • I consume a diet high in fat and cholesterol
  • I consume a diet high in red and processed meat and/or low in plant sources
  • I consume a diet low in fruits and vegetables
  • I consume a diet of excessive calcium intake
  • I consume a high fat diet
  • I consume alcohol and/or use tobacco in combination
  • I consume two or more alcoholic drinks a day
  • I don’t exercise regularly
  • I don’t get regular Pap tests
  • I drink excessive amounts of alcohol
  • I drink hot mate (a popular south american drink)
  • I frequently engage in anal sex
  • I have been exposed to second-hand smoke
  • I have had many sexual partners or a partner who has had many partners
  • My diet is high in salty foods

  • Genetic disorder/abnormality
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome
  • Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)
  • Li Fraumeni syndrome
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1
  • Bladder cancer
  • Bone cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer
  • Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Kidney cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Melanoma
  • Ataxia-Telangiectasia or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
  • Intraocular melanoma
  • Uterine cancer
  • Breast cancer (especially in a mother, sister or daughter or if a women has hereditary mutations on specific genes, such as the BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 genes)
  • Colon cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Uterine cancer
  • Colon cancer
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • RB1 gene mutation (Retinoblastoma)
  • Testicular cancer
  • Thyroid cancer

  • Testicular cancer
  • I suffer from Choledochal cysts or Gall bladder Polyps
  • I have Von Hippel-Lindau, tuberous sclerosis, or Birt-Hogg- Dube disease
  • I have Typhoid
  • I have primary acquired melanosis and/or ocular melanocytosis
  • I have plummer-vinsan syndrome
  • I have pernicious anemia
  • I have Neurofibromatosis, Turcot syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome or Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome
  • I have Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus
  • I have hypertension
  • I have Human T-Cell Leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1
  • I have HPV
  • I have HIV/AIDS
  • I have HIV
  • I have hepatitis C virus (HCV)
  • I have hepatitis B virus (HBV)
  • I have Helicobacter Pylori
  • I have had throat cancer
  • I have had polyps, chronic IBS and/or colon cancer
  • I have had ovarian cancer
  • I have had mouth cancer
  • I have had melanoma
  • I have had lung cancer
  • I have had gallstones
  • I have had cancer
  • I have had breast cancer
  • I have Gastroesophageal reflux disease or Barrett’s esophagus
  • I have gallbladder disease
  • I have fibrous dysplasia
  • I have Epstein – Barr Virus
  • I have cirrhosis of the liver
  • I have chronic pancreatitis
  • I have Bowen’s disease
  • I have an impaired immune system
  • I have a weakend Immune system
  • I have a viral infection
  • I have a stomach condition
  • I experience GERD- acid reflux
  • Blood disorder (i.e. Myelodysplastic syndrome)
  • Autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis
  • I have taken hormone replacement therapy
  • I have received radiation therapy to lungs
  • Is or has been treated with certain medication such as cyclophophamide (used to treat cancer and other conditions)
  • I overuse painkillers, aspirin or other medications
  • I have undergone PUVA therapy
  • I have taken the drug tamoxifen
  • I have taken immunosuppressant drugs
  • I have taken hormone replacement therapy
  • I have not been screened for colorectal cancer
  • I have had stomach surgery
  • I have had radiation therapy to the brain
  • I have had radiation therapy
  • I have had chemotherapy
  • I have been exposed to radiation
  • I experienced estrogen replacement therapy
  • I am on long-term dialysis

  • I have been exposed to certain industrial chemicals
  • I have been exposed to radiation
  • I have been exposed to chemicals
  • I have had exposure to vinyl chloride
  • I went through menopause after 55
  • I have not had children or I had them later in life
  • I have given birth to more than one child
  • I am diabetic
  • Irregular ovulation
  • I have never been pregnant
  • I have a history of not ovulating
  • I began menstruating at an early age
  • I am post menopausal or had late menopause
  • I have irritation or damage from drinking very hot liquids
  • I have been exposed to chemical fumes
  • Not getting screened regularly with a Pap test
  • I have been exposed to aflatoxin
  • I have high blood pressure
  • I have been exposed to cadmium (batteries, paint or welding materials)
  • I have not tested my home or workplace for carcinogens
  • I have unusual moles
  • I have more than 50 moles
  • I have had severe, blistering sunburns
  • I have frequent exposure to the sun/indoor tanning
  • I am a Welder or have been exposed to welding
  • I have Phimosis (tightening of the foreskin)
  • I am uncircumsized
  • I have been exposed to wood and or cement dust
  • I have been exposed to second-hand smoke
  • I have been exposed to the metal cadmium
  • My testicles descended late
  • I testicles developed abnormally
  • I have goiters or benign thyroid nodules
  • I have been exposed to radioactive fallout
  • I started menopause later than average
  • I have never given birth
  • I have chronic anovulation
  • I have endometrial hyperplasia

  • I have type A blood
  • I have fair skin and light eyes
  • I have many freckles
  • I have light coloured skin, eyes and hair
  • I have skin and eye moles

You Added:
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Annual Diagnostics

Regular screenings are designed to find cancer early, when it is most curable. Identify your group below to find the list of annual screenings applicable to you.
  • Under 50
  • Over 50
men under 50
men over 50
*African-American men should consider screening at 45
**Men with a family history of prostate cancer (especially brother or father) and African-American men should consider screening at 40-45 as they have a higher chance of developing prostate cancer

women under 50
women over 50
*Doctor may recommend screening earlier if you have a strong family history, genetic disposition and/or have high risk factors
**Doctor may recommend women over 65 can stop having this test as long as they have had 3 negative tests within 10 years

  • Under 50
  • Over 50

Self Exams

Check out these handy infographics below to learn all about how to touch yourself!

Breast self exam

Self breast exams are awesome. They might be awkward at first, but they’re really important, so stick with it. (Like really important: The National Breast Cancer Foundation cites that 70% of breast cancers are found through self exams and with early detection, the five year survival rate is 98%!) You’re not looking for cancer every time you get handsy, it’s more about getting to know the girls really well so if anything changes, you’ll notice. So light some candles, throw on Barry Manilow, and touch yourself. Check to make sure the girls are looking and feeling like their usual fine selves. Ensure their shape, size and colour are normal. If you see any of the following, make an appointment with your doctor: dimpling, puckering, bulging of the skin, change in nipple position, nipple inversion, redness, soreness, rash, or swelling (more than the monthly swelling that can accompany your period). breast exam

Testicular self exam

Gents, things are about to get steamy. Like handful of balls steamy. Of course we’re talking about Testicular Self Exams. Go have a shower, the heat relaxes the skin on your scrotum making during or after one the perfect time to check out the boys. Get that penis outta the way and check one ball at a time. Remember, this isn’t about finding cancer most of the time, its more about getting to know the boys so well that if something does change you’ll notice. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in males between the ages of 15 and 39. So make sure to do this once a month to protect your special parts. testicular exam

Melanoma self exam

Couldn’t help but notice that you’ve got some skin there… like wow, you’re covered in it! I bet you want to keep it safe. To perform your monthly mole check, you’ll need a mirror.  Scope out your legs, your back, special area, in between your fingers and your toes. Check yourself all over! The first time will take a little longer ’cause you have to take inventory of all your moles, spots, and freckles. This isn’t about searching for cancer every time. It’s about getting to know your body really well so that if something changes, you’ll know. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. Melanoma specifically spreads faster than any other skin cancer and is 95% curable if caught in stage one. Melanoma can be easily detected by a self exam. 
PS. This could be fun to do with a partner too, a great excuse to explore every inch of each other. melanoma exam

Cheat Sheets

Cancer. Dealing with and understanding cancer is confusing and hard. We want to make it as simple and easy as possible. This is where you can find answers to your burning questions and the ones you didn’t even know you had. Whether you’ve got a concering lump or a nagging symptom, are looking to prepare for a diagnostic test or understand your diagnosis. Trying to figure out your choice and the right treatment, or just want to know what happens after cancer.. We’ve got you covered. explore the tabs below to learn about cancer

Concern

Nobody knows your body better than you. So whether you find something concerning, have a worrisome symptom, or just know something is   off… go to your doctor!  You can check out our Body Map for more info on warning signs and head here to understand more about risk factors.

cancer-diagnosis

Communicating with your partner when you have cancer. It’s all about truth & love. You are not alonego to your partnerfor support. Openness and honesty is key. Be mindful. Even when you are frightened or angry, be careful of how you express those feelings. Cancer is to blame, not them. Yes, it is you who has the cancer, but it effects them a great deal. Be conscious of this when communicating with them. Reactivate joy with humor for both of you. Intimacy is important, find ways to connect. Endorphins released during sensuality make people happy, and being held calms the nervous system and decreases anxiety. 3 ways to get started now: Say thank you for their supportbe it in a love letter, a poem, or a song. Make a habit of checking inemotionally once a week. Do something special to show your appreciation – make breakfast in bed or give them a massage. Dos: Together, find a way for you to receive reminders of appointments and daily obligations. Ask your partner for help when you need it. Notice when you need to grieve. Find the appropriate person/persons during these times if it needs to be someone other than your partner. Don’ts: Don’t settle if the two of you are unhappy with your doctors. Hunt for the right team. Don’t go it alone. Support groups are a good source of gaining an understanding from other people’s experiences. Don’t think your life has to stop. Practice old rituals, find ways to laugh.

Communicating with your best friend when you have cancer. It’s all about truth & love. It’s your job to keep them up to date& tell them what you need. Be specific & truthful they aren’t mind readers, never will be. Though cancer can sometimes make people feel uncomfortable, it’s not your job to make them feel better, it’s theirs to support you. Fear and confusion are natural feelings that are hard to express. Do your best to share everything, even if it’s scary. You are not alone welcome your friend’s support. You are going to deal with a mountain of information at every doctor’s appointment, let your friend help by accompanying you to take notes. Let your friend protect you. There is such a thing as cancer etiquette – people will say and ask stupid things. 3 ways to get started now: Ask for the help you need -be it with chores, food, or the kids. Make a habit of checking in emotionallyonce a week. Thank them it shows that you recognize and appreciate that this is hard for them too. Dos: Let them spend time with you, it will help them heal too. Ask your friend about what’s going on with them, you still have to be a friend too. Exercise helps with many side effects of treatments, enlist your best friend to be your workout partner. Don’ts: Try to protect your friend by creating distance. They can handle this. Get upset if they don’t understand or say the wrong thing. This is new for them too. Give empty responses if they ask you how you’re doing. Tell them.

Communicating with your work when you have cancer. It’s all about truth & support. Share only what you feel comfortable with. Brief them on the process so they know what’s to come. Speak to your specific diagnosis and help provide the important information they may need. Make it clear that not all cancers are the same. Be honest with yourself about how much your life will change. Plan with your workplace to triage the workload. Set meetings to update them on your treatment plan. Know what the health procedures are. Have a meeting with hr to find out: How you are protected/how are you to be supported by your company. If you belong to a small organization draw up terms of agreement that you are both comfortable with. 3 ways to get started now: Say thank you for their supportwrite an email or bake something for your office, like fuck cancer cupcakes. Make a habit of checking inwith the appropriate person once a week so everyone feels at ease. Celebrate with them when you hear good news – have an office dance party! Dos: Share your treatment plan and dates with the appropriate member of your team so that they know when to support you and re-arrange the workload and prepare to be without you while you recover. Ask for help. If your workload is too heavy make sure to talk about it with your team. Don’ts: Don’t be upset if a colleague says something irritating or hurtful. They’re likely trying to be supportive, but just don’t know what to say. You have the right to teach them what’s appropriate. Don’t pretend you can handle it. If you are struggling with side effects from treatments or medications, take the rest you need.

Communicating with your partner who has cancer. It’s all about truth & love. Create a safe placefor both of you to express your fears and needs. Set the example of openess encourage them to share their emotions. It may be difficult for your partner to feel safe expressing themselves as they try to process their feelings. While truthfulness is paramount, be honest in a way that is appropriate to your partner’s feelings. Make sure you are responding rather than reacting. Hugs and affection will soothe anxiety, sadness, and fear. Remind them they are not alone by expressing that they are part of a relationship. Show your support with words and through actions. Your partner may be feeling alone. Counteract this with an abundant amount of love and intimacy. 3 ways to get started now: Be romanticrun a bath and fill it with petals, make a candle-lit dinner or write a poem. Make a habit of checking inemotionally with your partner once a week. Have a golden oldies movie nightsnuggle the evening away with some dark chocolate. Dos: Be their advocate and use your voice when they are too shy to ask for help from family/friends. Support them. Chemo-brain can make them forgetful, so find an appropriate way to remind them ie: Schedule of appointments up in kitchen, daily meetings etc. Use humor. Battling cancer is hard – laughter will help alleviate stress. Don’ts: Don’t settle if the two of you are unhappy with your doctors. Hunt for the right team. Don’t forget about yourself. Notice when you need to grieve. Find the appropriate people to seek advice and support from.
Communicating with your partner when your child has cancer. You found out your child has cancer before your partner. Now it’s your job to tell them. How? Do this in person. When? As quickly & safely as possible. Where? This isn’t about the location, it’s about the environment. Aim for a private & safe space. What? Type, grade, stage, diagnostics, treatment. Be specific & include details if you can. Be patient & kind. The diagnosis affects both of your lives remember that you’re in this together. Keep them informed & involved. 80% of fatal pediatric cancers end in divorce. this experience is extremely hard on relationships. Cancer is the enemy. Not your partner. Dos: Ask for support. Unload chores and responsibilities on family and friends to help the two of you cope. Be team players. Keep each other in the loop. If appointments are missed, record them for your partner. Don’ts: Don’t forget that cancer is in your life, but not your entire life. Make it your job to lift the spirit of your family.
Communicating with your child who has cancer. It’s all about truth & love. Kids follow by example. Set the example of openess to encourage your child to express their emotions. Children are intuitive they likely know something is wrong. It’s your role to educate – your child hasto know what’s going on in their body. Be honest. If you don’t tell them the story, they’ll come up with their own. Talk to your doctor to tailor the message to your child’s maturity and way of understanding the world. Remind your child often that they did not cause their cancer. You’re allowed to freak out, just not in front of your kid. Avoid negative associations with your child’s cancer, as it may lead them to believe they’ve done something wrong. Hold them. Hugs and affection calm the nervous system and will soothe anxiety, sadness, and fear.

Newborns – 2 year olds: Children of this age do not understand cancer. They are more in tune with what you’re saying, not how you say it. Be mindful of your tone, volume, pace and energy. They don’t like being separated from their parents. people they don’t know can frighten them. Babies need to play and laugh. Schedule play time and fun, as you would normally. Toddlers love to learn and reading to your child is a great way to expose them to language and knowledge while giving you quality time. 3 ways to get started now: Set a playdate. Sing or dancetogether. Make a positive association with doctors appointments, such as a soft blankie or special toy. Dos: Routine is perceived as safety to children of this age, so it’s common for them to throw tantrums when they’re confused. You can give them a sense of control by letting them make decisions when appropriate such as choosing which toy to play with or movie to watch. Don’ts: Don’t take your child’s childhood away. Playdates, family, friends, and fun are just as important now than ever. Don’t overlook your relationships. Make sure you have a partner to support you, be it a spouse, friend, or family member. Take care of yourself. Don’t go through this alone. Don’t settle if you are unhappy with your doctors. hunt for the right team until you feel safe.
2 – 7 year olds: At this age, children are figuring out the world around them by asking many questions. Answer them. Find meaningful ways to make your child understand their cancer. Separation can make your child feel unsafe; reassure them with affection, both physical and emotional. Don’t trick your child into going to the doctor. Prepare them for the events of the day by learning what to expect for appointments, tests and treatments. Children often don’t entirely understand their cancer, so remind them often of what it is and why they need treatment. 3 ways to get started now: Let your child wear their costume to the doctor. It can help make them feel like a superhero or ballerina. Create a magical item that brings your child security during treatment, such as special shoes or a fantastical wand. Make things togetherlike food, arts and crafts, or music. Dos: Allow them to make choices whenever they can, like choosing their outfit or type of juice, because there are so many things they don’t get to choose with cancer. Aim to ensure your child is present and aware during their cancer. Fun activities shouldn’t be a distraction, they should serve to balance. When talking about cancer try explaining it as “confused” cells as rather than “bad” ones. The word “bad” can make them feel like they’ve done something wrong or have something bad inside them. Don’ts: Don’t let your child push boundaries. The fundamentals you instill in your child now will still shape who they become.
8 – 12 year olds: Children at this age are ready for more information than you may think. Arm them with the answers to their own questions and those they may get from their friends. At this age, children are beginning to fully understand cancer. This can be scary and destabilizing, so reassure them with constant information and affection. They can co-operate for doctor appointments and treatments, if they understand why it’s necessary. Prepare yourself and your child by learning what to expect. Involve them in decision making, whether about treatment or what’s for dinner. This helps offset the decisions they can’t control. Treatment doesn’t feel good a lot of the time. Periodically explain why treatment is needed and that it won’t last forever. 3 ways to get started now: Let your child wear their costume to the doctor. It can help make them feel like a superhero or ballerina. Create a magical item that brings your child security during treatment, such as special shoes or a fantastical wand. Make things togetherlike food, arts and crafts, or music. Dos: Find children of the same age, and if possible, with the same stage and kind of cancer, to play with. This can help offset the fear of feeling different. Explain cancer cells as ‘confused’ rather than ‘bad’. The word ‘bad’ can make them feel they have done something wrong or that they have something bad inside them. Don’ts: Settle if you are unhappy with your doctors. Hunt for the right team until you feel safe. Be overprotective. Kids deserve a childhood. Put on a show. Your child will see right through any attempt to downplay emotions or information. They are very in tune with what you mean, not what you say.
13 years and older: Teenagers have little patience for omission. Your child is learning how to communicate as an adult. It’s your job to lead by example with open and honest dialogue. Build trust by sharing their entire prognosis and keeping them informed on everything that is happening in their body. Teenagers crave external validation and acceptance. Strive to give them a normal teenage experience whenever possible. Don’t forget that all teenagers are hormonal and emotional. your teen is no different. Be aware. Because of their age, your child may find an escape in things such as partying, drugs and alcohol. 3 ways to get started now: Plan a bbqfor your kids and their friends, encourage yourhouse to be the hangout spot. Help them with their homeworkand make a plan to manage school responsibilities. Organize outingsto concerts or sports events. Dos: Give your child an equal voice in major decisions such as their treatment plan. Help them create a community of other teens who are going through something similar so that they don’t feel isolated. Don’ts: Let them push boundaries. Create structure around routine and expectations as you would normally. Put on a show. Your child will see right through any attempt to downplay emotions or information. Children of this age are very in tune with what you mean, not what you say. Be overprotective. They are still teenagers and deserve to experience adolescence.

Communicating with your sibling who has cancer. It’s all about truth & love. It’s hard to askfor help. Just because your sibling doesn’t ask for help doesn’t mean they don’t need it. Pinky swear you’ll be open with each other. Educate yourself about what cancer is and how your sibling’s specific kind of cancer may change their day-to-day life. No matter your age, clear communication is key. It will help everyone in the family get comfortable with expressing their emotions. Strive to communicate your reactions in a supportive, honest manner. Take the initiative and be the one to lead by example. Be thoughtful small things make a big difference. Love is shown through actions. Showing someone you care is just as important as saying that you care.support your sibling in a way that is meaningful. Find ways to ease their workload, household chores, or just make them laugh. Learn about the 7 stages of acceptance to prepare for what’s to come emotionally. if you support yourself, you’ll be better able to support your sibling.

I am a…

Kid: Know you’re not alone. If you have a question, ask for the answer. Talk to your parents about everything you are feeling. They’d like to know how you’re doing. All of their children are very special to them.  It’s not your fault.  Nothing you did caused cancer. Your brother or sister’s cells are confused and have forgotten how to grow properly. the doctor needs to teach them how again. Treatment is how the doctor will help your sibling get better. At times, when you feel strong, you will comfort your brother or sister. At other times, they will be strong, and will be able to comfort you. After all, you are siblings. Affection is a two way street. 3 ways to get started now: Bake anddecoratewith one another. Pull out the barbies or the gi joes and use your imaginations! Hit up the aquarium and learn about all the fishies in the sea together! Dos: If you are scared, angry or sad at cancer you can tell someone. Be sure that this person understands that you are not mad at your sibling because cancer is not their fault. Tell your brother or sister that you love them. When your parents agree that your brother or sister is feeling well enough, invite their friends from school to come over and play. Don’ts: Don’t forget that they need to have fun. When your sibling is well, play with them the way you used to. This will help them feel good.
Teen: Educate yourself. You may need some time and an expert to help you work through your own feelings. Don’t be scared of showing your emotions. Expressing them will set the example for your sibling that they are allowed to express as well. Speak openly with your parents about your feelings. Together, find someone you can turn to, like a doctor, relative or friend if you are too afraid to share everything you are feeling with your parents. Be a good listener. Listening to what they have to say will help them feel connected to you and supported by you. 3 ways to get started now: Have a movie night for just the two of youmake popcorn and giggle over jelly beans. Make them a journalto record their emotions and experiences in. Make a compilation of funny video clipsfor days when they need a good laugh. Dos: Be a “constant” in a changing world. Be a source of stability. Encourage their friends to support your sibling. Let them know when your sibling is doing well enough for visits. You know your sibling well, help make them laugh to brighten any day. Don’ts: Don’t be jealous if your sibling is receiving more of your parents’ time. Talk to your parents if you’re feeling left out. Don’t forget the friendship between you and your sibling is very important. Put time aside to spend just with them.
Adult: Openness and honesty are critical to your relationship. Do your best to share everything. Work hard to make them feel safe and comfortable sharing their highs and lows with you. Your sibling may be feeling confused, scared and alone right now. This is your opportunity to provide support when they need it most. Being there physically when possible is important. Make sure they have companionship for doctor visits/chemo days etc, if they want. If your sibling is distancing themselves from you, they may be trying to protect you. They need help even if they don’t say it. Be their guardian. There is such a thing as cancer etiquette – people will say and ask stupid things. It is appropriate to stop them. 3 ways to get started now: List your sibling’s choresfor friends/family to manage while your sibling is undergoing treatment. Before heading to the doctor,help your sibling prepare a list of questions, and take notes for them during the visit. Cook for them.stock their fridge full of food you know they can stomach while undergoing treatment. Dos: Keep the lines of communication open. encourage them to use their voice. Build trust, you are their safe person. Encourage their friends to support in a meaningful way. Practice old rituals. find ways to laugh. Don’ts: Don’t forget to ask about them. They have lives too. Don’t forget to be mindful. Even when you are frightened or angry, be careful of how you express your feelings. Cancer is to blame. Not them. Don’t ‘protect’ them from information that you would otherwise tell them. They still want to be part of your life.
Communicating with your friend who has cancer. It’s all about truth & support. They need your encouragement if you think it, then say it or show it – send a card, email, text. Seek news from a caregiver your friend is likely overwhelmed. Cancer affects a whole family. Support your friend and their family when needed. Be there as a source of support and encouragement. If they ask for space, follow and respect their guidance. Reactivate joy with humor laughter will alleviate stress. Your friend needs help even if they don’t say it. Be available. They need to concentrate on healing. If you want to do something for them, find a way to strengthen this part of their journey. Help out by bringing over food, just check with your friend first about what they feel like eating. 3 ways to get started now: Send them a card write down all the wonderful and inspiring things about them so they remember how strong they are. Cook or bake something for them be sure to find out if anything makes them nauseous due to their treatment. Send them flowersso they have something cheerful and beautiful in their home. Dos: Be mindful. Cancer becomes a family affair. Triage with the family to find the best ways you can be of help. Include your friendin any experience they would have enjoyed before their diagnosis. Don’ts: Don’t let your emotions get in the way of the best interests of the patient. Ie: At times, they may ask for space. Be conscientious of their requests. Don’t visit unannounced. call before you show up. Make sure your friend feels like having company. Don’t just say, “let me know what i can do”. Instead, offer specific ways in which you can help.
Communicating with your employee who has cancer. It’s all about truth & love. Accept that their role may change as they move forward with treatment. Have a plan b so your team does not suffer. Ask your employee to educate you on their unique case. Critical to working relationship dynamics is open communication. Encourage a safe environment so they willingly provide updates. Learn about your company’s policy on cancer. Does it seem reasonable? Is it adequate and supportive? If you believe no, then fight for change. Discuss what can be shared with other employees. Have scheduled updates where the two of you can discuss how to balance their workload and cancer. Scheduled meetings are an appropriate time for you to inquire about your employee’s health. It also offers a good time to make changes to the strategy if needed. 3 ways to get started now: Show your support make a fuck cancer banner for your office! Make a habit of checking inwith them once a week so they feel comfortable in the office. Take them for lunch. Dos: Learn about the process of battling cancer so you know what to expect. Be active in formalizing a plan. Strategizing a way forward at work will lessen the anxiety of your employee.don’ts: Don’t think cancer is a death sentence. Many people with cancer lead normal lives. Make decisions based on the reality of your employee’s unique kind of cancer. Don’t say silly things: “i know how you must be feeling” isn’t helpful. Speak candidly with them and resist using a tone filled with pity. Don’t leave the team out of it – encourage your team to help in a way that is appropriate – eg: Fundraise to support them financially.
How to tell someone you have cancer. Telling someone you have cancer is difficult. They deserve to know,so find the courage to tell them. It’s not your job to calm them, it’s their job to support you. Timing is important. Find a time where they can give you their full attention. Place, choose a calm space with a warm environment. Reactions, don’t hope or expect any particular reaction. they are generally not going to be what you expect. Repetition, it can be difficult for peopleto internalize what you’re sayingoffer to repeat the information. If you are too nervous, write a letter instead. Sit next to them as they process the news. Sometimes it’s hard to know where to begin, the list below might help. 1. Tell them the location, kind and stage of cancer. 2. Explain what cancer is, and what your specific cancer means. 3. It is helpful at this point to specify survival rates for your diagnosis to help people understand your cancer better. 4. If you know what treatment plan you are going to be moving forward with, share it with them. 5. Have vetted reading material ready for them to go over in private. If you have to share the news over the phone due to distance, make sure the timing is right. Talk to them when they have space in their day to absorb the news.

Meditation: Meditation is a mind & body process. It allows you to cope with thoughts, medical problems, stress. There are many kinds of meditation. You can begin by sitting in a comfortable position with your eyes closed. Focus on your breathing and body position. Let go of all scattered thoughts. Focus on the presence & calmness you experience. Light a candle & concentrate on the flame if you’re struggling to still the mind. For 15 – 20 mins twice a day you can become the guide of your body & yoda of your mind. Your mind is the most powerful tool your body has. Meditation allows you to control that power & channel it to where you need it most. Why it helps for cancer: Reduces stress and anxiety, improving your emotional, social and mental well-being improves chances of a positive treatment outcome. Helps with pain and can even have a greater effect than some pain relieving drugs. Helps with feelings of losing control especially in patients recently diagnosed with cancer. Ideas to get started: Do deep breathing exercises. Relax and stretch your body. Make a meditation area in your home, free of distractions and disturbances. Put on relaxing music. Do meditation yoga.
Laughter: Laughter is an automatic reaction to something that amuses us. When we first begin to smile, it activates 15 different muscles in the face. The brain releases endorphins which have a euphoric, pain-relieving effect. Laughing exercises the cardiovascular system by lowering blood pressure & raising heart rate, which sends more oxygen to your blood tissues. We love to laugh. The average adult laughs 17x a day. Laughing has amazingly positive effects. Boosts the immune system, reduces anxiety & stress, reduces symptoms of depression. So when you feel better after laughing, it’s because you really are happier & healthier. Why it helps for cancer: It releases endorphins and serotonin that make you feel good. Humor has been used in medicine throughout recorded history. The most famous story of humor therapy involved norman cousins, who cured himself of an unknown illness with a self-invented regiment of laughter and vitamins. It is a way we can feel connected, part of a group and more comfortable with others. Ideas to get started: Laughter yoga. We’re not just being funny, it really exists! Go to a local stand-up or comedy show. Watch funny videos on youtube. People do the weirdest things. Spend time with friends. friends can be the best source of laughter.
Writing: Writing is a sequence of letters, words, or symbols. It composes our thoughts, ideas, experiences, feelings into literary form. When writing, you are using both hemispheres of the brain, integrating the entire mind. Some studies show that writing can help reduce pain and improve physical health in patients dealing with cancer. Long-term benefits of writing are fortifies our immune system, relieves stress, reduces blood pressure, improves cognitive functioning. Why it helps for cancer: Organize your thoughts. Emotional therapy. Helps with recovery and quality of life after treament. Mental well-being helps fight body infections. Ideas to get started: Start journaling. Create a blog. Contribute to forums and online communities. Take creative writing classes. Write a letter to someone. Handwrite thank-you cards to friends and family.
Dance: Dance is your body moving rhythmically to music. This movement stimulates you mentally & physically. Leading to a great mind-body connection. Dance also increases endorphins & enhances the functions of our circulatory, respitory, skeletal & muscle systems. Fun fact: Olympic 800-meter runners, swimmers, cyclists, part-expressive art form, part-physical exercise, dance is a fun and easy way to improve your physical, mental & emotional health at any age or fitness level. Why it helps for cancer: It’s a fitness regime that’s more fun than a treadmill. Overall, dancing can improve your quality of life and ability to heal. if one is feeling down, the combination of music and movement can improve mental and emotional well-being, lift the spirits and relieve unwanted stress. Ideas to get started: Solo-dance in your room to your favorite tunes. Dance with friends & family. Take up dance classes. Doesn’t matter if it is hip hop or ballroom style, as long as you’re moving to a rhythm.
Music: Music is the art of vocal or instrumental sound or the combination of both to produce harmony and express emotion. Playing & listening to music can affect our hormones & encourage the production of testosterone & oxytocin. It even triggers a release of endorphines. Music also slows down & equalizes brain waves. The slower the brain wave the more content & peaceful you feel. There is evidence that with regular music therapy your language skills creativity happiness & more can improve. Why it helps for cancer: Reduces anxiety. Improves breathing and heart rate. Music therapy is proven to improve comfort, relaxation, and pain control. Ideas to get started: Sing along to the radio or ipod. Pick up a new instrument. Listen to new artists and music. Join a band or jam with a friend. Teach a friend how to play an instrument.
Sleep: Sleep is when the sandman comes. It is also when our nervous system is inactive, muscles are relaxed, and consciousness is suspended. 97% of people can’t function properly on 6 hours of sleep or less. The average adult needs 7-9 hours of sleep daily to function at their best. If you don’t get enough sleep the effects are: Inability to cope with stress, lack of concentration, moodiness and fatigue, reduced creativity. Why it helps for cancer: Reduces stress. Women who experience a lot of stress double their risk of breast cancer. Reduce risk of cancer by increasing melatonin and catching more z’s. Ideas to get started: Set up a regualr sleep schedule. Engage in relaxing activites before sleep. Cut down on caffeine and stimulants around 2pm. Reduce lighting in your room before sleeping. Invest in a good and comfortable bed. Regular exercise makes for better sleep. Take short naps.
Breathing: Breathing is the most important activity in your body. It takes air to the lungs & then expells it. We take about 15 breaths /min. That’s about 21,600 breaths per day! Our system requires 88 lb of oxygen daily. When oxygen enters the bloodstream it fuels your body, nourishing your muscle tissue. Not to mention if you don’t do it you’ll probs pass out! Why it helps for cancer: Improves concentration, memory and alertness. Strengthens your immune system. Increases energy level, imroves sleep and reduces stress. Cancer cells thrive on lack of oxygen. Breathing helps to kill those cancer cells. Ideas to get started: Breathe through your nose. Practice meditation and yoga. Maintaining good posture helps you breathe properly. Avoid shallow chest breathing, relax your shoulders and breathe with your lower torso (your stomach should rise and fall, not your shoulders).

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