Keep Joy Alive

Our Colorectal Cancer Program

Colorectal cancer (AKA colon cancer) occurs in the colon(large intestine) or rectum (the passageway that connects the colon to the anus). Sometimes abnormal growths, called polyps, form in the colon or rectum, over time, some of these polyps can turn into cancer. So how do you know if you have polyps?  Screening tests. They can find them so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Early detection is critical, because if they are cancerous, this is when it’s most curable.

The Low Down

Colon cancer is the 3rd most common cancer diagnosed in the US (excluding skin cancers).

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2018 there will be:
· 95,520 new cases of colon cancer
· 43,030 new cases of rectal cancer
Diagnosed in the USA.

A lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is approx.
- 1 in 21 (4.7%) for men
- 1 in 23 (4.4%) for women

- It’s the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American women

- It’s the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men

- It’s expected to cause about 50,630 deaths during 2018.

Thanks to increased screening and polyp removal prior to cancer formation,
the death rate from colon cancer has been dropping in both men and women for several decades.
What’s more, treatment for colorectal cancer has improved over the last few decades.
As a result, there are now more than 1 million survivors of colon cancer in the United States.

    The Truth

    Despite overall rates of colon cancer decreasing nationally, there are certain racial and ethnic minorities in the US that are impacted by diagnosis and mortality more than others. Why? A lack of trust in medical professionals, obstacles to accessible health care, genetics specific to African American males and a stigma around colonoscopies & screening procedures.

    From 2009-2013, colon cancer rates in blacks were about 20% higher than whites, and death rates are 40% higher than whites.

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      From 2009-2013, colon cancer rates in blacks were about 20% higher than whites, and death rates are 40% higher than whites.

      From 2009-2013, colon cancer rates in blacks were about 20% higher than whites, and death rates are 40% higher than whites.

    AM I AT RISK?

    As you get older your risk of getting colon cancer increases. That’s why screening is so important, especially everyone age 50 to 75 (45 for African American Males).